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The Sun Articles

Muiz Banire > The Sun Articles (Page 7)

Oil industry deregulation and Nigerian economy

One area of the economy in Nigeria that has been worrisome for ages now is the petroleum industry. Like any other Nigerian, one is worried about the state of our petroleum products pricing. For years, the petroleum sector became the barometer to guage how much an average Nigeria was suffering as there was perennial shortage of supply of petroleum products to local consumers, thereby necessitating long queues at petrol stations. This was often the case any time there were agitations that there would be increase in the pump price of petroleum products. In some of my write ups in the...

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Public office and dilemma of transparency

A high level of service to the public is carried out in occupation of public office. This, therefore, makes requirements for occupying public office to be high public-spiritedness, consuming passion to serve and absolute dedication to high moral standard. Certain practices in Nigeria have made it imperative for us to consider two aspects of practices in public office, both of which relate to accessibility and transparency issues. The first relates to barring members of the public from accessing public office and, by extension, public officials, in the course of the discharge of their official responsibilities. This vice, in my view, predates...

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Nigeria: Sad Tale of Insecurity

Prior to and up till 2015, a disturbing development terrifying the unity and wholeness of Nigeria was the Boko Haram insurgency to which thousands of lives had been lost in the northeastern part of Nigeria. The challenging speed at which several crimes associated with insurgency were being perpetrated, leading to destruction and displacement of thousands of people from their ancestral lands, led many Nigerians to detest the style of governance of the People’s Democratic Party (PDP) under the presidency of Dr. Jonathan Goodluck, GCFR. The zenith of it all was the confounding abduction of hundreds of schoolgirls in Chibok, which...

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EFCC CHAIR AND UNNECESSARY CONTROVERSY

As propounded by the ruling party, All Progressives Congress (APC), and by extension the government of the day, to all Nigerians, anti-corruption remains a cardinal programme of the government. In virtually all facets of life of Nigerians, the government of Nigeria has been struggling to eliminate corruption. To what extent the government has been able to address this concern, remains a subject of controversy. Suffice, however, to state that from my personal perspective I have always said that there is over-concentration of efforts on loot recovery at the expense of combating corruption holistically. There is no doubt that fighting corruption...

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Where Jakande faltered, no grass may grow again

When death comes calling, it leaves a sour taste of irredeemable loss. The whole world descends on the deceased in appreciation of his good deeds and forbids negative assessment. The bold ones would, however, come out of the taboo and break the shells of hypocrisy that tradition has mischievously woven into human mentality, particularly in Africa, where it is said that you do not speak ill of the dead. That is why the Sage says, “Live your life well and spare us the need to lie at your funeral.” Today, I am X-raying the leadership qualities of our great departed soul,...

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CENTRAL BANK AND CRYPTOCURRENCY BAN

The recent development in the banking industry has called for this intervention. Although it is a matter about which I cannot lay claim to any competence, as a pedestrian in the area, I observe so much policy summersaults and inconsistencies that tend to suggest confusion as a result of experimentation by the institution involved. This is in the management of the economy by the apex bank, the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN). Not quite long ago, the CBN stopped payment of dollars to those who transferred funds from abroad into the country, or whose receipt in the country was denominated...

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Service Chiefs: Better Late Than Never

President Muhammadu Buhari has just changed the military service chiefs. The conclusion in some quarters, which we equally share, is “better late than never.” Although it will seem, as the spokesmen of the President always say, the President has his own style and hates to be stampeded into decisions, it is clear that he is actually not oblivious of the agitations of the people for this practical step that he has just taken. Such an attitude has its good and bad sides. It may suggest a calculative and reflective leadership acumen that is not hasty in taking decisions. It may, on...

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COVID-19: Let us get serious

In the wake of the pandemic and the confusion surrounding its nature, several protocols were developed around the elimination of the disease, particularly the transmission process. For example, human beings are expected to maintain a physical and social distance of two metres from each other. The washing of hands with soap and water and the regular sanitization of hands after touching any surface was institutionalized. Public transportation protocol in terms of the number of passengers to be moved by vehicles was stated. All social and religious gatherings were forbidden, including closure of hotels and all entertainment centres. Isolation after exposure...

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Rethinking the absolute franchise system in Nigeria (2)

In my last column on the above topic, I had canvassed the view that Nigeria needs to reset her template in terms of the franchise system it operates. In that piece, Thursday, January 14, 2021, “Rethinking the absolute franchise system in Nigeria,” I was and am still of the opinion that the power to exercise franchise must not be an unqualified one. In essence, it must not be a free rein without any measurable parameter towards entitlement. In reaction to the contention, so many queries were raised, the most pertinent of which is that it is an undemocratic practice to...

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Rethinking the absolute franchise system in Nigeria

In Nigeria, the history of voting rights is as complex as the diversity obtainable in the country. Thus, any attempt at x-raying the arrays of differences on the subject may be unhelpful to the corpus of the discussion herein. Consequently, for the purpose of our engagement under consideration, I simply will remind us that voting rights in the nature of universal suffrage evolved too rapidly in the country. That is to say, between the year 1954 when the general election proper commenced and the year 1979 when the universal suffrage was allowed nationally, there was a restriction on voting rights...

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