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The Sun Articles

Muiz Banire > The Sun Articles (Page 9)

Lekki shooting: Matters arising

Tuesday, the 20th day of October, 2020, has been described as a ‘Black Tuesday’ in Lagos, Nigeria, due to the alleged massacre of some unarmed protesters at the Lekki Toll Gate by men of the Nigerian Army. It is the day that the Lekki Toll Gate acquired international recognition, as both the people of Nigeria and the world in general read about the incident that occurred there. The recognition was, however, not in a palatable sense, as the remembrance of it in the future can only be connected with the ‘massacre’, or at least a carnage that occurred there. Controversy...

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Nigeria, where are we going?

For more than a week now, the youths in the country have taken to the streets for one reason or the other, ranging from the excesses of the defunct police squad, code-named, Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) to the insecurity in some parts of the country; the most prominent aspect of the struggle being the campaign against the retention of SARS in the country. Recall that, after some procrastination by the Inspector-General of Police (IGP), Muhammed Adamu, there was presidential intervention, leading to the disbandment of the squad. This disbandment, it was thought, would lead to the cessation of the protest...

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End Nigeria police?

Let me start by stating categorically that this is the most tortuous piece I have written in recent times, not because of the need to search for materials or absence of relevant thoughts but for the singular fact that I have had to rewrite the content virtually daily in the last five days as events change by the minute, hour and daily. This continues to necessitate my revisit of the content as the dynamics change. I dare say that this is largely reflective of what an average Nigerian has to contend with in the country in order to survive the...

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Mr President, please have mercy

In the last couple of weeks, there has been agitation around the increase in the price of petrol due to the removal of subsidy by the Federal Government; avoiding the controversy around the existence or otherwise of the subsidy in the first instance. Equally of similar dimension in terms of protests in the nation is the purported removal of subsidy in the unit price of electricity per kilowatt. As a result of the increments and the reactions from several quarters, particularly the labour unions, I have been inundated with a lot of enquiries from my readers both in this column...

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COVID-19 and aviation industry

Distinguished Nigerians, let me wish you happy Independence celebration, though I know as a fact that you are hardly celebrating in the true sense of the word. Like the street urchins always put it, “igboro o re rin o”, meaning, the society and, by extension, the people are not smiling. And, as the chief priest always says after unveiling any misfortune through his oracle, “all is well”. Let me now progress into our discussion today. For over four months, I have ceased to write anything about the COVID-19 pandemic as I rightly or wrongly believe that the subject has become...

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Gana: Stop the extrajudicial killings

In not too distant a time, I wrote in my column about the story of a young suspect arrested by the police, who opted for the termination of his life rather than being sent to prison. In that story, the young man told the public the story of how he was sent to the Nigerian prison (Correctional home) for stealing a phone handset, from where he graduated upon release to a hardened criminal involved in armed robbery and rape. Upon his re-arrest, he had pleaded that his life be terminated instead of imprisoning him again, which he believed would further...

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Political leaders, social pact and the citizenry

In the last couple of years, there has been agitation around the emolument of the legislators in Nigeria. The accusation has been that it is shrouded in secrecy for the singular reason that it could not be justified, particularly in the face of the humongous rate of hunger and poverty in Nigeria, coupled with the battered state of the economy of the nation. The executive is equally not spared, particularly in terms of the various appropriated pension schemes, security vote, and, of recent, multiple compensations for those privileged to be ministers or legislators afterwards. It is the belief of the...

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Impact of illiteracy on public office

Although the literal meaning of the word ‘illiterate’ connotes someone who cannot read or right, on a pragmatic level, it could imply ignorance, notwithstanding the ability of the person involved to read or write. That is why, at times, you hear such descriptions as financial illiterate, political illiterate and medical illiterate, implying that, though the person can read and write, he is ignorant of that field of human endeavour. It is in this context that my analysis in this piece will go beyond mere ability to read and write. Ordinarily, a literate person is considered to be a knowledgeable person. Knowledge...

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Speedy justice: In defence of judges

I am sure that you are wondering what that is, ‘speedy justice.’ It is a term often wrongly used to denote efficient delivery of justice. Justice is justice and any delay in the dispensation of justice amounts to injustice. This is why the saying in legal parlance is “justice delayed, is justice denied.” Thus, it is either we have justice through speedy resolution of disputes or we do not have it, but that is a story for another day. However, what this means is speedy administration of justice. It implies the resolution of disputes within a reasonable time in a generous...

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Like father, like son

The above saying captures the recent event that took place in Enugu, where a man was accused of demolishing part of the perimeter fence of the Enugu Airport. In retaliation, the state government equally decided to demolish the building put up by the man; a simple case of tit for tat. When I read about the incident, I was taken aback, and the simple picture that came to my mind was that of a jungle. Is this not sickening? I have once described the various scenarios in Nigeria as largely denoting lawlessness bordering on anarchy. Or how does one describe...

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