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December 2020

Muiz Banire > 2020

Taming insecurity in Nigeria (1)

If in recent times, there has been any issue of interest to an average Nigerian, or a topic much interrogated in the media, it is insecurity of lives and properties in Nigeria. The situation appears so bad that most missions in Nigeria issue travel advisories from time to time warning their citizens against any unnecessary sojourn into Nigeria, and for those inevitably within to be vigilant at all times and watch their backs. Nigerians across the nation are equally not at peace within and outside their homes. Not only during the day must your eyes be kept open, the night...

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Issues in Nigerian food security

Nigeria will appear to be currently ravaged from all fronts. As the country is grappling with security challenges nationally, the economy is hemorrhaging so badly to the extent of its been in second recession. Corruption remains unabated while the standard of living depreciates daily. Inflation continues to be on the rise to the extent that food inflation is nearing nineteen percent now. Virtually every stable food price is towering above the reach of the common man. Unemployment figure soars as factories and businesses close down on a daily basis due to several factors ranging from the effect of the pandemic...

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Health care delivery: The capital market option

A while ago, I spoke on the deplorable state of the Nigeria’s health care facilities, just in the same manner several Nigerians have spoken about the problem. It is common knowledge, as alluded to above, that there is practically no functional public health care facility, properly so called, in Nigeria. Hence, this reality of the comatose state of Nigeria’s healthcare facilities requires no further lamentation as such could amount to kicking a dead dog. Consequently, my mission is to interrogate the possible options of salvaging the health care system in Nigeria, particularly the funding aspect. In my piece titled “Our...

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APC and the proverbial one-eared dog

The depth of Yoruba language as shown in its aphorisms laced with ancient but always relevant wisdom will not cease to amaze any proficient speaker of the language. In this piece, I am not out to celebrate the flowers of the language, the beauty of its rendition or the bottomless depth of its wisdom. I only intend to examine a recent national development that proves the soundness of the Yoruba proverb that talks of the proverbial wise-after-the-event dog that only learnt to stow the knife after its ear was amputated. A t’ehin ra ogbon, a g’eti aja, won ge leti...

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Nafest, covid-19 and the paradox of insecurity

The just-concluded 33rd National Festival of Arts and Culture (NAFEST) is one of Nigeria’s major positive developments of 2020. But the wonderful cultural showpiece was almost eclipsed by incidents of insecurity and the overwhelming impact of COVID-19 pandemic the very period the fiesta climaxed in Jos, Plateau State. Indeed, the spate of both coronavirus and insecurity was an assault on humanity. They touched the raw nerves of Nigerians and evoked global outcry. While we are still reeling from the shock of recent attacks by insurgents and bandits, it is important to, take a few minutes to exult in the feats of...

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Between the people and the police, who is to blame?

This question becomes pertinent and compelling to ask in the wake of the recent protests against the defunct Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) of the Nigeria Police Force and the Police Force in general. The police institution is established for the protection of the citizens generally and by all standards, must be the friend of the people. It is in recognition of this fact that the police institution usually displays posters to the effect that the police is your friend in all its outlets. What then could have gone wrong as to render the erstwhile partners foes? This is the crux of...

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#EndSARS protest: The road map

The story of today revolves around a wise man that knows the limit of his strength. Most times, people crash because they fail to appreciate the limit of their capacity. This applies to leadership and, by extension, government. To situate the gist of this piece properly, I am taking a brief and elementary excursion into the concept of social pact.   Recall that, during the state of nature, all individuals had their natural rights, which they exercised maximally. There was no restriction as to the way and manner in which individuals exercised their rights. Consequently, conflicts and chaos characterised that era, and...

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#EndSARS probe: Going beyond surface scratch

Nigeria has, at different times been described as a nation of no consequences due to the fact that failure of leadership, indiscretion in governance and deliberate wastage of people’s goodwill have not, on most occasions, attracted condign punishments whether through the implementation of the laws or collective resolve of the people who ought to check such irresponsibility by their voting power. As we recycle same set of delinquent politicians whose mastery in governance is self-aggrandizement and wanton gluttony, the nation has remained prostrate as a reclining giant.   Due to this, without any form of pretense to clairvoyance or supernatural powers, I...

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Reaping the fruit of our labour

As I ruminate about the word ‘hoodlum,’ certain questions that agitate my mind are: Who are these hoodlums? Are they humans or spirits? Are they Nigerians? What could be their mission? Are they sane? Could they be arsonists or terrorists as suggested or insinuated in some states like Osun and Edo? In my quest for the appreciation of the description, I checked my dictionary and found out that it means either of two things: a violent criminal or a young ruffian. The latter description I believe is a lesser evil that could be tamed as, most times, it relates to...

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Lekki shooting: Matters arising

Tuesday, the 20th day of October, 2020, has been described as a ‘Black Tuesday’ in Lagos, Nigeria, due to the alleged massacre of some unarmed protesters at the Lekki Toll Gate by men of the Nigerian Army. It is the day that the Lekki Toll Gate acquired international recognition, as both the people of Nigeria and the world in general read about the incident that occurred there. The recognition was, however, not in a palatable sense, as the remembrance of it in the future can only be connected with the ‘massacre’, or at least a carnage that occurred there. Controversy...

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